4572 Claire Chennault, Addison, TX 75001 | 972-380-8800 | Hours: Mon-Sat: 9am - 5pm, Sun: 11am - 5pm | Admission: Adults: $10, Seniors & Military: $8, Children(4-12): $5
 

 Cavanaugh Flight Museum Warbirds Over KADS


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The Cavanaugh Flight Museum aircraft collection is one of the finest in the world.  Use the links provided below to learn more about the collection!

Pfalz D.III

The Pfalz D.III was the first original design from Pfalz Flugzeugwerke (airplane factory). Prior to WWI, Pfalz Flugzeugwerke produced Morane-Saulnier monoplane designs under license. In September 1916, Pfalz began producing the LFG Roland D.I and D.II fighters under license. In November 1916, Rudolph Gehringer was hired as Pfalz’s chief engineer, and immediately began work on an original fighter design.

 

Pfalz D.III At Cavanaugh Flight MuseumThe Pfalz D.III is a single engine biplane with a plywood monocoque fuselage. The first prototype was built in April 1917 and then type tested by the German military in May. After successful testing, Pfalz was directed to halt production on the Roland fighters and begin manufacturing to the new design. Like the Roland design, the D.III has a plywood monocoque fuselage, which consists of: two layers of thin plywood strips, placed over a mold to form one half of a fuselage shell. The fuselage halves are then glued together, covered with a layer of fabric, and doped. This construction method gives the fuselage great strength, light weight, and smooth contours compared to conventional construction techniques of the time.

Deliveries to German Fighter Squadrons (Jastas) began in August 1917. In November 1917, Pfalz began producing the D.IIIa with relatively minor changes including a larger horizontal stabilizer, modified lower wing tips and machine guns repositioned to make it easier for the pilot to clear the jammed guns. Deliveries of the D.IIIa began in December and continued through May 1918. The D.IIIa remained in front line service until the end of WWI.

 

The D.IIIa on display is a full scale reproduction, built in 1987 by Ronald J. Kitchen. It was added to the Cavanaugh Flight Museum collection in December 2012.

 

ENGINE (ORIGINAL) Mercedes D.III, 180 h.p.
ENGINE (AS DISPLAYED)   Ranger L-440, 200 h.p.
ARMAMENT

Two 7.92 mm Spandau LMG 08/15 machine guns

WING SPAN 30 feet, 10 inches
LENGTH 22 feet, 10 inches
HEIGHT 8 feet, 9 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 2,045 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Pfalz Flugzeugwerke GmbH
REPLICA BUILT BY R.Kitchen
FIRST BUILT 1917
MUSEUM'S Dr.1 BUILT 1987
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 102 m.p.h.
RANGE 210 miles
SERVICE CEILING 17,000 feet

 

Halberstadt CL.II

 In late 1916, the Halberstadter Flugzeuwerke (airplane factory) began development of a new type of two seat fighter to fulfill a military requirement for a defensive patrol and pursuit aircraft. The new CL type aircraft were smaller than the existing C type and designed to escort reconnaissance aircraft.

 

Halberstadt CL.II at Cavanaugh Flight MuseumThe CL.II is a single engine biplane, with an all wooden structure. The fuselage is covered with thin plywood paneling and houses the crew of two in a single cockpit. It is armed with two fixed 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine guns for the pilot and a flexible 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine gun mounted on a raised ring mount, operated by a rear gunner.
 
After type testing with the military on May 7, 1917, the CL.II went into production and reached front line units by August 1917. With its excellent maneuverability, good climb rate, and wide field of view for the rear gunner, the CL.II received immediate acclaim. A total of 700 CL.IIs were built by mid 1918.

 

The CL.II on display is a full scale reproduction aircraft, built by Ronald J. Kitchen in 2009. It was added to the Cavanaugh Flight Museum collection in December 2012.

 

ENGINE (ORIGINAL) Mercedes D.III, 180 h.p.
ENGINE (AS DISPLAYED)   Ranger L-440, 200 h.p.
ARMAMENT

Two 7.92 mm Spandau LMG 08/15 machine guns for pilot

One 7.92 mm LMG 14 machine gun for rear gunner

WING SPAN 35 feet, 4 inches
LENGTH 23 feet, 11.5 inches
HEIGHT 9 feet, .5 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 2,495 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Halberstadter Flugzeugwerke
REPLICA BUILT BY R.Kitchen
FIRST BUILT 1917
MUSEUM'S Dr.1 BUILT 2009
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 102 m.p.h.
RANGE 290 miles
SERVICE CEILING 16,700 feet

Sopwith Camel

 

Small and lightweight, the Sopwith Camel represented the state-of the-art in fighter design at the time. The Sopwith Camel shot down 1,294 enemy aircraft during World War I, more than any other Allied fighter. However, it was so difficult to fly that more men lost their lives while learning to fly it than using it in combat.

The Sopwith company rolled out the first Camel in December 1916. Although it owed much of its design to earlier Sopwith aircraft like the Tabloid, Pup and Triplane, the Camel was a revolutionary machine in a number of respects. The plane's twin Vickers machine guns were mounted side by side in front of the cockpit -- a first for British fighters and a design feature that became standard on British fighters for nearly 20 years. Second, the pilot, engine, armament and controls were all crammed into a seven foot space at the front of the airplane. This helped give the plane its phenomenal performance, but it also made the plane very tricky to fly. Additionally, the plane's wood and fabric construction and lack of protection for the fuel tank made the Camel (like most W.W.I. aircraft) very susceptible to fire. Moreover, the poor state of pilot training during 1916-1917 meant that the average life expectancy of an English pilot was little more than two weeks.

In service, the Camel proved to be a huge success, despite its high accident rate. Camels fought all along the Western Front as well as being employed as night fighters and balloon busters. Some the earliest fighters used by the Royal Navy were Camels which were deployed from cruisers, battleships and even towed platforms. Additionally, Camels fitted with eight primitive air-to-air rockets proved to be very effective against German Zeppelins and long-range bombers.

The Sopwith Camel on display is a full scale flying replica built by Dick Day from original World War I factory drawings. The aircraft is fitted with original instruments, machine guns and an original Gnome rotary engine (something very rare in replicas). It is painted in the scheme of the World War I flying ace Captain Arthur Roy Brown, a Canadian flying with the Royal Air Force. Captain Brown is credited by many with shooting down Baron von Richthofen (The Red Baron). Captain Brown had 11 victories at the time of his disputed triumph and became ill shortly thereafter. He was hospitalized in England for ulcers and remained there throughout the war.

 

ENGINE Gnome 9 cylinder rotary 150 h.p.
ARMAMENT Two Vickers .303 machine guns
WING SPAN 28 feet
LENGTH 18 feet, 9 inches
HEIGHT 8 feet
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,482 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Sopwith Aviation Company
REPLICA BUILT BY Dick Day
TOTAL BUILT Approximately 6,000
TOTAL IN EXISTENCE Unknown
FIRST BUILT 1916
MUSEUM'S CAMEL BUILT 1968
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 115 m.p.h.
RANGE 290 miles
SERVICE CEILING 19,000 feet

 

Fokker D.VII

 

Arriving too late to alter the course of World War I, the Fokker D.VII was arguably the finest fighter of the war. Designed by Reinhold Platz, the D.VII competed against a number of other designs during a competition held in early 1918. The aircraft was tested by Baron Manfred von Richthofen, and he found the plane simple to fly, steady in a high-speed dive and possessing excellent pilot visibility. Thanks to the support of the famous "Red Baron", the D.VII was ordered into mass production as Germany's premier front line fighter. However, Fokker was unable to produce D. VIIs fast enough, so the Albatross and the Allegemeine Elektizitats Gessellschaft (A.E.G.) companies also produced the D.VII. When World War I ended in November 1918, these three companies had built more than 1,700 D.VIIs.

German pilots who flew combat in the D.VII marveled at the plane's high rate of climb and excellent handling characteristics. They also enjoyed the fact the D.VII's service ceiling was higher than most Allied fighter planes. This advantage allowed D.VII pilots to built up speed and energy during an attack run, giving them the luxury of being able to pick and choose their targets. In August 1918, Fokker D.VII's destroyed 565 Allied aircraft - making the D.VII one of the most feared aircraft of the war.

After the war, the victorious Allies required the Germans to hand over all remaining examples of the D.VII. However, about 120 examples of the type were smuggled into Holland where Fokker set up shop and continued to produce aircraft. The U.S. Army brought 142 D.VIIs back to the United States and used them as Air Service trainers for many years. Twelve D.VIIs were transferred to the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Marine Corps operated six of these aircraft until 1924. As a result the D.VII influenced the design of several later U.S. Navy fighters, including the Boeing FB-I which entered service in 1925. Additionally, the Swiss operated a number of D.VIIs well into the 1930s.

The Fokker D.VII on display is a full scale flying replica built by James Osborne from original specifications and fitted with an original Hall Scott engine and instruments. It is interesting to note that most of the D.VIIs handed over to the U.S. and England had their Mercedes engines replaced with engines built by the Hall Scott company. The replica aircraft on display is painted in the personal colors of Ernst Udet of the German Air Command. Captain Udet was one of the more famous German aces of World War I and was credited with 62 Allied kills. During the late 1930s, Udet headed the Luftwaffe's Technical Department and was largely responsible for rebuilding the German air force prior to World War II.

 

ENGINE Hall Scott L-6,160 h.p.
ARMAMENT Two 7.92 mm Spandau machine guns
WING SPAN 29 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH 22 feet, 10 inches
HEIGHT 9 feet
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,984 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Fokker Aviation
REPLICA BUILT BY James Osborne
TOTAL BUILT Approximately 1,700
TOTAL IN EXISTENCE 7
FIRST BUILT l918
MUSEUM'S D.VII BUILT 1990
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 117 m.p.h.
RANGE 165 miles
SERVICE CEILING 19,685 feet

Fokker Dr.1

 

The Fokker Dr.1 is one of the most famous and recognizable fighter planes of World War One. The Dr.1 (Dr standing for Dreidecker or 3 wings) was designed by Reinhold Platz and was ordered into production on July 14, 1917, in response to the success of the British Sopwith Triplane earlier in the year. The first production model of the Dr.1 was delivered personally by Tony Fokker to the Red Baron, Rittmeister Manfred von Richthofen, and shortly after that in August of 1917 it made it’s first appearance in combat.

Pilots were impressed with its maneuverability and soon scored victories with the nimble triplane. In the hands of an experienced pilot, the Dr.1 was a formidable dogfighter. The three wings produce tremendous lift which, combined with its small size and weight, meant it could out climb and out-turn almost any opponent. The Dr.1 was not for the inexperienced pilot. On landing, rudder effectiveness virtually disappears when the tail drops below the horizontal position; that's why ax handle skids were bolted under the bottom wings, saving many pilots from an otherwise disastrous ground loop.

Wing design flaws caused several crashes and led to withdrawal of the Dr.1 from service in October of 1917. Although the wing design was improved, the introduction of the more advanced Fokker D.VII (also on display) meant the end of the Dr.1.

Only 320 Fokker Dr.1s were produced and no original examples exist. The Fokker Dr.1 on display is a full-scale reproduction with a more modern Warner radial engine, as well as a tailwheel versus the traditional tailskid. The aircraft is painted in the color and markings of the plane flown by Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the infamous "Red Baron". Von Richtofen scored the final 21 of his 80 victories in the triplane. He was Germany’s highest scoring ace of World War One.

 

 

 

ENGINE Oberursel Ur II or LaRhone, 110 h.p.
ARMAMENT Two 7.92 mm Spandau LMG 08/15 machine guns
WING SPAN 23 feet, 7 inches
LENGTH 18 feet, 11 inches
HEIGHT 9 feet, 8 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,295 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Fokker Aviation
REPLICA BUILT BY G. Shepherd & E. Lansing
TOTAL BUILT 320
TOTAL IN EXISTENCE Originals: 0; Replicas: Unknown
FIRST BUILT 1917
MUSEUM'S Dr.1 BUILT 1980
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 115 m.p.h.
RANGE 185 miles
SERVICE CEILING 23,000 feet

North American B-25H Mitchell

 

Named after General Billy Mitchell, the Army Air Corps' most famous figure of the 1920s and 1930s, the North American B-25 proved to be one of the best American weapons of World War II. First flown on August 19,1940, the B-25 was a rugged, adaptable and accurate medium bomber. Famed for its role in the Doolittle Raid on Japan, the B-25 served around the world and flew with several air forces. North American produced the Mitchell in many different models, nearly 10,000 B-25s in all.

B-25H 43-4106 AT KADS

 

The Mitchell proved to be highly flexible and was fitted with a wide variety of armaments. Some versions of the B-25 were armed with no less than fourteen forward firing .50 cal. machine guns; while the B-25H boasted a 75mm cannon mounted in the nose. Besides being used as a horizontal bomber, the B-25 was used as a low-level attack and anti-shipping aircraft. Since the end of World War II, B-25s have been used as private transports and are common participants at air shows.

 

The museum's B-25H, s/n 43-4106 was manufactured in the North American Aviation factory in Englewood, California in 1943, and is the #2 prototype of the "H" model. During WWII, this B-25H served stateside until 1947, when it was declared surplus and sold it to the Bendix Corporation who used it as a test aircraft, in the development of new jet fighter landing gear systems.
 

Although 43-4106 did not serve in combat, the restoration group decided to paint the aircraft in the colors of a combat veteran B-25H. Their choice was the B-25H "Barbie III" as flown by Lt. Col. Robert T. "R.T." Smith in 1944. Lt. Col. Smith was one of the original members of the American Volunteer Group (AVG) also known as the "Flying Tigers", protecting China as part of the Nationalist Chinese Air Force before the United States entered WWII. After the AVG disbanded in 1942 he returned stateside for a time as the Commanding Officer of the 337th Fighter Squadron, 329th Fighter Group in California. Smith volunteered to return to the China-Burma-India theater (CBI) of the war with the 1st Air Commando Group of the 10th Air Force as commander of the group's B-25 Mitchell squadron in low-level attack and bombing missions. His aircraft, the "Barbie III" was named in honor of his wife, Barbara Bradford, who he married shortly before he departed for the CBI. Lt. Col R.T. Smith flew a total of 55 combat missions in the aircraft over Burma and was awarded the Air Medal, Distinguished Flying Cross, and Silver Star.
 

 

ENGINE Two Wright R-2600-92 Cyclones 1,700
ARMAMENT 14-.50 CAL. MACHINE GUNS AND ONE 75MM T13E1 CANNON PLUS 2,000 LBS. OF BOMBS OR DEPTH CHARGES 
WING SPAN 67 feet, 7 inches
LENGTH 51 feet, 3.75 inches
HEIGHT 16 feet, 4.18 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 33,500 pounds
CREW 5
MANUFACTURED BY North American Aviation
TOTAL BUILT Nearly 10,000
TOTAL B-25s EXISTING 164
FIRST BUILT 1940
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1943
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 272 m.p.h.
RANGE 1,350 miles
SERVICE CEILING 24,200 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 43-4106

Douglas A-26C Invader

 

The Douglas A-26 was the fastest bomber in the USAAF inventory, and went on to serve the US and Allied nations for many years. It was conceived as a replacement for the company's A-20 "Havoc/Boston", as well as the North American B-25 "Mitchell" and Martin B-26 "Marauder" medium bombers.

Development began in 1940, led by the prolific Edward Heinemann, with the XA-26A prototype taking to the air on July 10, 1942. In June 1942, the contract was amended to include a second prototype, the XA-26B, with forward-firing guns installed in a solid nose. Extensive testing resulted in a standard arrangement of six .50 caliber machine guns. Weapons capacity was rated at 6,000 pounds of internal and external stores - a full ton more than the Marauder.

Invaders first saw combat on June 23, 1944, with the Fifth Air Force in the Pacific. They also served in the European theater, starting in September 1944. A total of 1,355 B-models were produced at Douglas plants in Long Beach, CA and Tulsa, OK.

Later in development, the A-26C featured a glassed-in nose compartment for the bombardier and higher-rated, water-injected R2800 engines. A strengthened wing allowed it to carry an additional 2,000 lbs of bombs or up to 14 five inch rockets, along with six wing mounted .50 caliber machine guns. Douglas delivered 1,091 C models.

Post-war (re-designated B-26) Invaders flew day and night interdiction missions in Korea. Even more powerful and heavily armed K models, known as "Counterinvaders," flew interdiction in Vietnam.

As further proof of its adaptability, many surplus Invaders were converted to business use, with a passenger compartment in place of the bomb bay. Its high cruise speed made the A-26 the fastest executive transport available prior to the Learjet.

The A-26C on display; serial No. 44-35710, was manufactured at the Douglas Aircraft Company, Tulsa Oklahoma and delivered to the USAAF on May 20, 1945. The first assignment was with the 10th Air Force in Karachi, India in August 1945. After the end of WWII it was returned to the US and put into storage. In April 1947 to 173rd Fighter Squadron (Air National Guard) Lincoln AP, NE. The rest of the assignments are as follows: November 1948 to 122nd Bombardment (Light) Squadron (ANG) New Orleans AP LA. In April 1951, transferred to Langley AFB, VA. January 1952, to 424th Bombardment Squadron (Tactical Air Command), Langley AFB, VA. June 1954, to 102nd Bombardment Squadron (Air National Guard), Floyd Bennett Field, NY. July 1955, to 2500th Air Base Wing (Continental Air Command), Mitchell AFB, NY. October 1956, to 38th Tactical Bombardment Wing (US Air Forces Europe), Laon AB, France. It was retired from military service as surplus in March 1958.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum added 44-35710 to its collection in 2008. The aircraft is painted in the color scheme of the 69th Tactical Reconnaissance Group of the 9th Air Force, WWII.

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINES Pratt & Whitney R-2800 developing 2,000 h.p.
ARMAMENT 6 - .50 cal. machine guns in wings; 2 - .50 cal. machine guns in remote-controlled dorsal turret; 2 - .50 cal. machine guns in remote-controlled ventral turret & up to 6,000 lbs of ordnance (4,000 lbs. in bomb bay and 2,000 lbs. external on the wings)
WING SPAN 70 feet
LENGTH 50 feet
HEIGHT 18 feet, 3 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 35,000 pounds
CREW 3
MANUFACTURED BY Douglas Aircraft Company
TOTAL BUILT Over 2,400
FIRST BUILT July, 1942
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT May 1945
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 355 m.p.h.
RANGE 1,400 miles
SERVICE CEILING 22,000 feet
Serial Number 44-35710

North American B-25J Mitchell

 

Named after General Billy Mitchell, the Army Air Corps' most famous figure of the 1920s and 1930s, the North American B-25 proved to be one of the best American weapons of World War II. First flown on August 19,1940, the B-25 was a rugged, adaptable and accurate medium bomber. Famed for its role in the Doolittle Raid on Japan, the B-25 served around the world and flew with several air forces. North American produced the Mitchell in many different models, nearly 10,000 B-25s in all.

 

The Mitchell proved to be highly flexible and was fitted with a wide variety of armaments. Some versions of the B-25 were armed with no less than fourteen forward firing .50 cal. machine guns; while the B-25H boasted a 75mm cannon mounted in the nose. Besides being used as a horizontal bomber, the B-25 was used as a low-level attack and anti-shipping aircraft. Since the end of World War II, B-25s have been used as private transports and are common participants at air shows. Today, "How `Boot That!'?", the crown jewel of the Cavanaugh Flight Museum's collection, is the most original, flying B-25 anywhere in the world. Constructed in Kansas City, Kansas, the Army Air Force accepted this B-25 in August 1944. Assigned to the 380th Bomb Squadron, 310th Bomb Group, 57th Bomb Wing, the aircraft arrived in Italy shortly after its completion. From the fall of 1944 through late spring 1945, this aircraft completed more than eighty combat missions over northern Italy, southern Austria and what was Yugoslavia. The majority of these missions targeted rail bridges in the Brenner Pass, a 100-mile corridor through the Italian Alps which sheltered the main railway line from Germany to Italy.

Following World War II, this aircraft (unlike most B-25s) returned to the U.S. and continued to serve with the Air Force as a TB-25N multi-engine trainer. The Air Force dropped the plane from its inventory in 1958, after more than a decade of use as a trainer. In 1968 the aircraft appeared in the famous film "Catch 22". The aircraft moved in the early 1970s to the East Coast and found a home on a platform in a military cemetery near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After many years on the plat

form, the plane was purchased by Harry Doan, who added it to his large warbird collection in Florida. The Cavanaugh Flight Museum acquired the B-25 in 1992 and shipped it to Chino, California for restoration.

The restoration of "How `Boot That!?" is complete in every detail and all of the plane's systems are fully operational. Jack Kowalik, the same artist, who first created the plane's distinctive nose art in December 1944, faithfully reproduced it as part of the restoration effort. "How `Boot That!?" won the title of Grand Champion Warbird at the 1995 E.A.A. Oshkosh Fly-In and the 1996 E.A.A. Sun `n Fun Fly-In and is a testament to the hard work of the plane's restoration team.

 

ENGINE Two Wright R-2600-92 Cyclones 1,700
ARMAMENT Up to 18 .50 cal machine guns and 4,000 lbs. of bombs
WING SPAN 67 feet, 7 inches
LENGTH 52 feet, 11 inches
HEIGHT 16 feet, 4 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 35,000 pounds
CREW 7
MANUFACTURED BY North American Aviation
TOTAL BUILT Nearly 10,000
TOTAL EXISTING 164
FIRST BUILT 1940
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1944
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 272 m.p.h.
RANGE 1,350 miles
SERVICE CEILING 24,200 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 44-28925

Ryan PT-22 Recruit

 

Odd looking and finicky to fly, the Ryan PT-22 offered a challenge to cadet pilots that the Boeing PT-17 (N2S-4) or the Fairchild PT-19 did not. The PT-22 was known for its demanding ground handling characteristics. Though not as successful or as well known as the PT-17 or the PT-l9, the Army Air Force utilized the PT-22 as a primary trainer throughout World War II and, today, the aircraft is sought after by warbird collectors around the world.

Designer Claude Ryan became famous following the success of Charles Lindbergh's Trans-Atlantic flight. Yet, despite the fame and attention that the “Spirit of St. Louis” brought to the Ryan Aeronautical Company, Ryan decided to concentrate more on building his flight training schools rather than additional aircraft. By 1933, however, Ryan was once again designing aircraft and introduced a low-wing monoplane with fixed landing gear, the Sport-Trainer (more commonly referred to as the “Ryan ST”). The ST became a force in the home and export markets.

In 1940, with America's entrance into World War II only months away, the U.S. Army Air Corps (AAC) evaluated a ST (called the XPT-16 by the AAC) and ordered 100 for use as primary trainers. Fitted with a powerful Kinner radial engine, the XPT-16 went through a number of different variants before the definitive PT-22 entered service. Considered similar in layout, the PT-22 differed from earlier versions in that it was not equipped with faired landing gear or wheel spats. A total of 1,043 PT-22s were built for the AAC, with an additional 100 NR-1 aircraft purchased by the U.S. Navy, and 25 purchased by the Dutch (these aircraft were later turned over to the AAC as the PT-22A ). Not surprisingly, most AAC PT-22s served at Ryan-operated training schools that were contracted by the AAC to provide primary pilot training to Army cadet pilots.

The PT-22 on display was manufactured by Ryan Aircraft in San Diego, California and was received by the U.S. Army Air Corps on November 13, 1941. It was then transferred to the Fifth Elementary Flying Training Detachment (36th Flying Training Wing, AAC Flying Training Command), Ryan School of Aeronautics, Helmet, California. It was based at Helmet until April 1944, when it was transferred to the 4847th Army Air Force (AAF) Base Unit (Specialized Depot, Air Technical Service Command), State Fairgrounds, Springfield, Illinois. In September 1944, the aircraft was transferred to the 4126th AAF Base Unit (A.T.S.C.), San Bernardino AAF Base, California and disposed of as surplus. The PT-22 on display is painted in the style of the Army Air Corps Recruits during World War II.

 

ENGINE Kinner R-540 radial,160 h.p.
WING SPAN 30 feet
LENGTH 22 feet, 7 inches
HEIGHT 7 feet
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,860 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY Ryan Aeronautical
TOTAL BUILT 1,148
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 200
FIRST BUILT 1941
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT October 1941
MAXIMUM SPEED 125 m.p.h.
RANGE 205 miles
SERVICE CEILING 15,400 feet

 

Stinson L-5E

 

The Stinson L-5 Sentinel was developed from the pre-World War II Stinson Model 105 Voyager. In 1941, the Army Air Corps purchased six Voyagers from Stinson division of Consolidated Vultee for testing. After design modifications for military use, the Voyager entered into service as an observation aircraft with designation O-62. In 1942 designation for this type of aircraft was changed from " O" for Observation to " L" for Liaison aircraft and the designation was changed to L-5 Sentinel.

The L-5 is a two-place metal frame, fabric covered, high wing observation- reconnaissance and medical evacuation aircraft. It has a 'drop' rear seat which permits carrying cargo or stretcher patient, and a hinged door on the starboard side of the fuselage aft of the cockpit for loading.

The L-5 was manufactured between October 1942 and September 1945, during which time a total of over 3,896 were built for the United States armed forces, making it the second most widely used light observation aircraft of World War II. Personnel in all service branches commonly referred to it as the "Flying Jeep".

The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps received 306 Sentinels from the Army, designating their models as the OY-1 and OY-2, while two versions went to the Royal Air Force as the Sentinel Mk. I and Sentinel Mk. II. After the war, most Sentinels were sold for surplus, but a number of aircraft (now designated the U-19) served in the Korean conflict. A few Sentinels remained in active military service until the late 1950s. Sentinels were also used by the Civil Air Patrol after WWII for search and rescue work.

In November of 1945 the "Sentinel Aircraft Company" a private venture purchased the manufacturing rights and remaining L-5 parts from the Stinson Division of Consolidated-Vultee. It is likely that at least a few dozen were eventually assembled from the stock of surplus factory parts and some of these may have been purchased by the Navy. The number of aircraft built by The Sentinel Aircraft Company is unknown and they apparently went out of business prior to 1950.

The L-5E on display was manufactured in 1947. It is painted in United States Marine Corps. OY-1 colors. It on loan to the Cavanaugh Flight Museum by: Russell Madden of Aubrey Texas.

 

 

ENGINE Lycoming O-435-1 185 h.p.
ARMAMENT None
WING SPAN 34 feet, 0 inches
LENGTH 24 feet, 1 inches
HEIGHT 7 feet, 11 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 2,150 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Stinson division of Consolidated Vultee
TOTAL BUILT More Than 3,896
TOTAL EXISTING Unknown
FIRST BUILT 1942
L-5E ON DISPLAY BUILT 1947
MAXIMUM SPEED 130 m.p.h.
RANGE 420 miles
SERVICE CEILING 15,800 feet

 

Douglas C-47 Skytrain

 

The C-47 is one of the best known transports of all time. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe, termed it one of the most vital pieces of military equipment used in winning World War II. In the mid 1930’s the US military needed a new transport/cargo plane and contracted with Douglas to adapt the Douglas Commercial or DC series of aircraft. The DC series was a new design being built for the airline industry in the early to mid 1930’s.

Douglas made several improvements to the early DC series culminating with the DC-3. The C-47 purchased by the US Army Air Force is the military version of the civilian DC-3 airliner. The major differences are a reinforced floor in the passenger/cargo area, complete with tie down rings for securing cargo. An astrodome was added on the upper fuselage, just aft of the cockpit for celestial navigation. The personnel door on the left side was made much larger to accommodate cargo loading. The door is split into three sections with the main two opening as a clamshell door. The third door, which is part of the forward door, can be opened to provide access for personnel via an air-stair, similar to an airliner door. The door is large enough to accommodate a complete Jeep with trailer or a 37MM anti-tank gun. The comfortable airline seating was also replaced with twenty-eight folding metal seats that were installed against the fuselage sides. Many C-47 aircraft had their tail cone removed and were fitted with a glider-towing hook, to facilitate towing troop carrying gliders like the Waco CG-4 used in the D-Day Invasion.

The C-47 was produced in greater numbers than any other Army transport and was used in every theater in World War II. The Army was not the only service to see the usefulness of this wonderful aircraft; the US Navy and Marine Corps used the aircraft, under the designation R4D. The British and Australians also ordered the C-47 and gave them the designation Dakota, short for Douglas Aircraft Company Transport Aircraft. At the end of World War II, more than 10,000 aircraft including all types and designations had been built. The aircraft operated from every continent in the world and participated in every major battle.

The design was so successful that many C-47 aircraft remained in US service through the Korean and Vietnam wars. Many C-47 aircraft, including the one on display were sold after World War II and put into civilian service as airliners and cargo aircraft. Many C-47/DC-3 aircraft are still in regular service today not only as museum aircraft, but also as cargo haulers and even as short haul airliners. Some C-47/DC-3 aircraft have been refitted with more modern turboprop engines, which is a testament to its superb design dating back to the early 1930’s.

The C-47 on display at the Museum S/N 43-15935 was delivered to the USAAF on May 29th 1944, and served in the 7th Air Force in Manila. It was then transferred to the 20th Air Force, 7th Fighter Command based at Northwest Field, Guam. It is painted in D-Day military transport colors.

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE Two 1,200 horsepower Pratt & Whitney R-1830 radial engines
ARMAMENT Some gunship versions were fitted with laterally-firing 7.62mm gatling guns with up to 15,000 rounds of ammunition; these were mounted in the fuselage left side.
WING SPAN 95 feet 6 inches
LENGTH 63 feet 9 inches
HEIGHT 17 feet
EMPTY WEIGHT 17,860 pounds
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 31,000 pounds
PAYLOAD 6000 lbs. of cargo or 28 airborne troops, or 14 stretcher patients with three attendants.
CREW 3
MANUFACTURED BY Douglas Aircraft Co.
TOTAL BUILT Over 10,000 (all types)
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1944
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
CRUISE SPEED 160 m.p.h.
NORMAL RANGE 1,600 miles
MAXIMUM RANGE 3,800 miles
SERVICE CEILING 26,400 feet

Yakolev Yak-3M

 

Designed and built in Russia, the Yakovlev Yak-3 was one of the smallest and lightest combat fighters produced during World War II. As such, it proved itself a formidable dogfighter at altitudes below 13,000 feet.

The Yak-3 grew out of an effort to produce a lighter, lower-drag version of the Yak-1 fighter already in production. Design work began in 1941, but the program was held back by delays with the newly developed Kimlov VK-107 engine plus the need to build the maximum number of Yak-1s. The first Yak-3 prototype, a combination of a new wing design mated to a Yak-1M fuselage, with additional modifications, finally took to the air in mid-1943. Production models using the proven VK-105PF-2 engine entered service in July, 1944. The design was so successful that over 4,000 Yak-3s had been produced by mid-1946.

It was used predominantly in a tactical role, flying low over battlefields and engaging enemy aircraft below 13,000 feet. With its high power-to-weight ratio, it was easily able to out-climb and out-turn its German adversaries, the Messerschmidt Bf-109 and Focke-Wulf FW-190, making it one of the most formidable dogfighters of the war.

The Yak-3M on display, serial no. 0410101 was built in 1994 at the Yakovlev aircraft factory in Orenburg, Russia using the original plans, tools, dies, and fixtures. It is painted in the colors and markings of Captain Louis Delfino, one of the Free French pilots of the Normandie-Niemen regiment Escadrille, NO-1 Rouen. Captain Delfino finished World War II with 16 victories and later became a general in the French Air Force.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGINE (ORIGINAL) Klimov VK-105PF-2, V-12, 1,300 h.p.
ENGINE (AS DISPLAYED) Allison V-1710-89, V-12, 1,300 h.p.
ARMAMENT 2 - 12.7 MM, machine guns & 1 - engine mounted 20 MM, ShVAK cannon
WING SPAN 30 feet, 2.25 inches
LENGTH 27 feet, 10.25 inches
HEIGHT 7 feet, 11.25 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 5,864 pounds
CREW 1
MANUFACTURED BY Yakovlev
TOTAL BUILT 4,130
FIRST BUILT 1943
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1994
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 407 m.p.h.
RANGE 559 miles
SERVICE CEILING 35,105 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 0410101

 

Piper L-4J

 

Although not as glamorous as some of the warplanes used during World War II, the “L-Birds” were instrumental in the ultimate victory of the Allies. Equipped with no weaponry other than the firearms carried by their crews and fitted with no protective armor plating, the Grasshoppers were easy targets for enemy ground fire or enemy aircraft. As a result, L-Bird pilots were considered among the bravest pilots of the war. They continued to bring back vital information despite their vulnerable position.

The first military version of the famous J-3 Cub was known as the O-59, and it entered service in September 1941. For a base price of $2100 to $2600 per copy, the Army Air Corps took delivery of thousands of these light planes in no less than 11 different models of militarized Cubs. In the field, the L-4 proved to be remarkably adaptable. Some L-4s were fitted with bomb shackles modified to hold 10 hand grenades which were released by pulling a cable from the cockpit. Other L-4s were even fitted with six “Bazooka” rockets. One such equipped L-4 was credited with destroying five German tanks! Finally, like the L-3B, some L-4s were modified to be unpowered glider pilot trainers (the TG-8).

The U.S. Navy and the Royal Air Force also used the L-4. In the U.S. Navy, the L-4 was known as the NE, HE or AE-1. The NE-ls were stock J-3s taken from Piper's inventory and pressed into service as primary trainers. The HE and AE-1 s were used as aerial ambulances. The “H” in HE-1 stood for “hospital,” and the “A” in the later designation AE-1 stood for “ambulance.” These naval versions of the Cub were fitted with larger engines and a longer turtle deck to fit a stretcher. L-4s proved easy to use at sea. L-4s launched from aircraft carrier decks or from specially modified LSTs (Landing Ship Tank) were used during the invasions of North Africa and Italy to direct artillery fire. Some L-4s were fitted with a special hook arrangement called the Brodie Device which allowed the planes to be “plucked from the air” by engaging a wire strung between two poles or booms.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's L-4J was delivered to the U.S. Army in 1945 and assigned to a number of military units as well as a Civil Air Patrol unit in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is painted in a scheme worn by reconnaissance L-4s during the D-Day invasion of Normandy.

 

ENGINE Continental O-170 65 h.p.
ARMAMENT None
WING SPAN 35 feet, 3 inches
LENGTH 22 feet, 5 inches
HEIGHT 6 feet, 6 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,200 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Piper Aviation
TOTAL BUILT Approximately 6,000
TOTAL EXISTING Unknown
FIRST BUILT 1941
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1945
MAXIMUM SPEED 85 m.p.h.
RANGE 190 miles
SERVICE CEILING 11,950 feet

 

Fairchild PT-19 Cornell

 

The success of American air power in World War II was based on two main factors: the quality of American aircraft used during the war, and more importantly, the quality of American pilots who flew those planes into combat. The Fairchild PT-19 Cornell was one of a handful of primary trainer designs that were the first stop on a cadet's way to becoming a combat pilot. Inexpensive, simple to maintain and most of all, easy to fly, the PT-19 truly lived up to its nickname - the “Cradle of Heroes.”

In the late 1930s, Sherman Fairchild hired the talented designer Armand Thiebolt to design an aircraft to satisfy the Army Air Corps' call for a primary trainer. The new plane had to be forgiving, have aerodynamic refinements for improved safety, feature interchangeable parts and be built from largely “non-strategic” materials (i.e. wood and fabric). Thiebolt rose to this challenge and set to work designing the M-62 (Fairchild's designation for the PT-19). The M-62 was fitted with a Ranger in-line engine giving the design a very narrow frontal area. The plane's low wing allowed for a widely spaced fixed landing gear which guarded against ground accidents. The PT-19's steel tubing frame and plywood sheathed wing and tail structures were light, strong and easy to care for; although the wings were susceptible to rotting in wet climates.

In September l939, the M-62 won a fly-off at Wright Field in Dayton, Ohio against 17 other designs and became the U.S. Army's primary trainer. Little more than a year later, 12 PT-19s a week rolled out of Fairchild's Haggerstown, Maryland factory. After America's entry into World War II, Fairchild could no longer meet the demand for PT-19s, so Howard Aircraft, St. Louis Aircraft, and Aeronca also began constructing PT-19s under license. Soon PT-19 airframes were produced faster than Ranger could build engines for them, and Fairchild began fitting Continental radial engines to PT-19 frames, calling the new aircraft the PT-23. Fairchild developed a nearly identical variant of the PT-19, the PT-26, for the Royal Canadian Air Force that featured fully enclosed cockpits to help combat the cold Canadian climate. By the end of the war in 1945, a total of 8,130 PT-19s, PT-23s and PT-26s had been produced to serve in such places as the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Norway, Latin America and Rhodesia.

The PT-19 on display was received by the United States Army Air Force on April 23, 1943. In May 1943, it was assigned to the 2559th Base Unit, Pine Bluff Arkansas. In July 1944, the aircraft was transferred to the 4136th Base Unit, Tinker Field, Oklahoma, and was eventually turned over to the Reconstruction Finance Corp. for disposition in August 1944. The paint scheme on the aircraft is the same Army Air Force scheme it wore during World War II. The “ED” on the tail indicates it served at the civilian run training facility located at Grider Field, near Pine Bluff Arkansas.

 

ENGINE Ranger L-440, 200 h.p.
WING SPAN 35 feet, 11 inches
LENGTH 27 feet, 8 inches
HEIGHT 7 feet, 9 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 2,450 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY Fairchild Aircraft
TOTAL BUILT 4,889
TOTAL EXISTING 272
FIRST BUILT 1938
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1943
MAXIMUM SPEED 124 m.p.h.
RANGE 480 miles
SERVICE CEILING 16,000 feet

Republic P-47N Thunderbolt

 

The much beloved Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, otherwise known as the “Jug” (due to the plane's resemblance to a milk jug), was one of the most successful Allied fighters of World War II. A monstrous aircraft, the P-47 roamed the skies over Europe and the Pacific destroying aircraft, tanks and rolling stock during daring low-level attacks over enemy territory. Built in large numbers and used by the U.S. Army Air Force (USAAF) and the Royal Air Force (RAF), the Thunderbolt proved equally effective at escorting B-29s over Japan or tank-busting in the Alpine valleys of Italy.

The P-47 design started in August 1939 as the AP-10, a small, lightweight, lightly armed fighter powered by an Allison in-line engine. As the air war over Europe progressed, the USAAF asked Republic to incorporate new items such as self-sealing gas tanks, armor plating for the pilot and heavier armament into the design. Republic realized that the new USAAF requirements could no longer be met by the AP-10's design, so they started over and built the XP-47B around the huge Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial engine and an internal armament of eight .50 caliber machine guns.

The first three operational P-47 squadrons entered service in November 1942. In January of that year, the P-47 reached England and on April 8, 1943, P-47s flew their first B-17 escort mission over Europe. Combat showed that the P-47 was a capable escort fighter -- it was tough, maneuverable and packed a heavy punch. However, the plane's massive engine used fuel at a terrific rate, giving the P-47 a relatively short range (even with drop tanks and an improved fuel management system). As the war went on, the P-47 was largely replaced as an escort fighter by the P-51 Mustang. Freed from their escort duties, P-47s fitted with bombs and rockets were sent against tactical ground targets throughout Europe. The P-47's role as a close air support aircraft during the Allied advance toward Germany has become legendary.

The final production model of the P-47 was the “N” model. The P-47N was designed for very long range operations in the Pacific escorting B-29s. A P-47N fully loaded with 5-inch HVAR rockets, bombs and up to 710 gallons of fuel in external tanks weighed nearly 21,000 lbs., heavier than any other single engine fighter of World War II. The P-47N on display was built in 1945 and is painted in the colors of 1st. Lt. Oscar Perdomo of the 507th Fighter Group in the Pacific during the final days of World War II. Perdomo shot down five Japanese aircraft on the last day of WWII making him the last “Ace in a Day” of WWII. This aircraft is owned by the Commemorative Air Force and is based at the Cavanaugh Flight Museum.

 

ENGINE Pratt & Whitney R-2800-73 Double Wasp 2,800 h.p.
ARMAMENT 8 - .50 cal. machine guns & up to 3,000 lbs. of ordnance
WING SPAN 42 feet, 7 inches
LENGTH 36 feet, 1 inches
HEIGHT 14 feet, 8 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 20,700 pounds
CREW 1
MANUFACTURED BY Republic
TOTAL BUILT 15,683
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 60
TOTAL FLYING 12
FIRST BUILT 1941
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1945
IN STORAGE AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 505 m.p.h.
RANGE W/ EXTERNAL TANKS 2,350 miles
SERVICE CEILING 30,000 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 44-89136

 

Lockheed PV-2D Harpoon

 

The Lockheed PV-2 Harpoon was conceived as an improved version of the company's PV-1 Ventura medium bomber and used by the US Navy during WWII.

 

The improvements included a completely redesigned tail assembly for better ground handling and single engine performance. Fuel capacity was increased from 1,607 US gallons in the PV-1 to 1,863 US gallons by the installation of integrated fuel

tanks in the wing outer panels. Wing span was also increased by 9 feet 6 inches.

 

The US Navy placed an order for 500 PV-2s on 30 June 1943. The first flight came on December 3, 1943, and deliveries began in March 1944. A serious problem was discovered with the integrated wing fuel tanks: the wings wrinkled and the tanks leaked. A complete redesign of the wing was necessitated and delayed entry of the PV-2 into service. The 30, PV-2s already delivered were used for training purposes under the designation PV-2C. The remaining 470 aircraft were produced with standard self-sealing tanks inside the wings.


The PV-2 entered combat in March of 1945 when Patrol Bombing Squadron 139 (VPB-139) returned to the Aleutian Islands, Alaska for a second tour of duty after having converted to Harpoons from Venturas. The combat use of the Harpoon by the Navy was fairly brief, and was cut short by the end of the war in the Pacific. The Navy continued to use the Harpoon until 1948 when the last PV-2 was retired from service.

After WWII many PV-2s were converted to executive transport. Their load carrying ability and fast speed made them ideal for the purpose.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's PV-2D Bureau Number 84060 is currently disassembled and in storage awaiting restoration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGINE Two Pratt & Whitney R-2800 developing 2,000 h.p, each
ARMAMENT 8-.50 cal machine guns in nose, 2-.50 cal machine guns in dorsal turret, 2-.50 cal machine guns in tail tunnel 8-5in HVAR Rockets or ; 4,000 lbs. total ordnance
WING SPAN 74 feet, 11 inches
LENGTH 52 feet, 1.5 inches
HEIGHT 18 feet, 3 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 36,000 pounds
CREW 4
MANUFACTURED BY Lockheed Aircraft Corporation
TOTAL PV-2s BUILT Over 500
FIRST BUILT 1943
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1945
IN STORAGE AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 282 m.p.h.
RANGE 1,800 miles
SERVICE CEILING 23,900 feet
BUREAU NUMBER 84060

Aeronca L-3B

 

When the United States began preparing for full scale military production prior to World War II, America's light plane producers were told that the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) had no interest in seeing their aircraft over the battlefield. It was not until the summer of 1941 that the USAAC asked the light plane industry for some lightweight planes for utility and liaison work. On July 15,1942, after having received a message in the field from Piper Corporation pilot Henry S. Wann, Cavalry Major General Innis P. Switt commented to Wann that, “You looked like a damn grasshopper when you landed that thing out there in those boondocks and bounced around.” Following an initial round of trials, the U.S. Army and Army Air Corps ordered thousands of light aircraft and the “Grasshoppers” were born.

Operating from farms, roads or hastily built airfields, the “Grasshoppers” were used for liaison (the “L” in L-Birds) and observation missions in direct support of Allied ground forces. There were several different manufacturers represented in the ranks of the L-Birds, namely Taylorcraft (L-2), Aeronca (L-3), Piper (L-4), Stinson (L-5) and Interstate (L-6). The Aeronca L-3 began its military career in 1941 as the O-58, the military version of the civilian Model 65 Defender. The L-3 had tandem seating for two, and the rear seat was arranged to allow the observer to sit facing either forward or backwards, depending on the mission. The L-3s were usually equipped with two-way radios and could perform many duties including artillery direction, courier service, front line liaison and pilot training.

In 1942, when the military glider pilot training program was accelerated, an O-58 was modified into a three-person glider. The engine was removed and the cabin was extended forward for a third occupant. Aeronca built 250 of these gliders and designated them TG-5's. These aircraft played an integral part in the training of the American glider pilots who would later make assault landings during the D-Day invasion in Normandy.

The L-3B on display was manufactured by Aeronca in Middletown, Ohio. It was accepted by the USAAC on July 13,1943 and was assigned to the Army Air Corps Radio Training Command at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. In September 1944, it was transferred to the 3058th Army Air Corps Base Unit Technical School ATC at Traux Field, Madison, Wisconsin. In October 1944, it was dropped from the inventory as surplus and sold. The museum's L-3B is painted in a color scheme representative of World War II L-3s.

 

ENGINE Continental O-170-3 65 h.p.
ARMAMENT None
WING SPAN 35 feet
LENGTH 21 feet, 10 inches
HEIGHT 6 feet, 6 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,300 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY Aeronca Aircraft Corporation
TOTAL BUILT Less than 1,400
TOTAL EXISTING Over 177
FIRST BUILT 1941
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1943
MAXIMUM SPEED 85 m.p.h.
RANGE 199 miles
SERVICE CEILING 7,750 feet

Boeing PT-13C Stearman Kaydet

 

Nicknamed the “Yellow Peril” thanks to its somewhat tricky ground handling characteristics, the Stearman is one of the most easily recognized aircraft. Its simple construction, rugged dependability and nimble handling made the Stearman much loved by those who flew and trained on it. The Stearman Kaydet, as it was officially named, was the only American aircraft used during World War II that was completely standardized for both Army and Navy use as the PT-13D (Army) and N2S-4 (Navy). Sold by the thousands after World War II, the Stearman has had a long and full career as a trainer, crop duster and air show performer. The name “Stearman” is so widely known that it has become the generic name for almost all currently flown biplanes. It is truly a “classic.”

The famed Stearman Model 75 has its roots in the earlier Model 70, which was chosen in 1934 as the U.S. Navy's primary trainer. At a time when biplanes were becoming a thing of the past, the Model 70 offered the fledgling pilot a steady and sturdy steed. Designed and built in only 60 days, the prototype Model 70 could withstand load factors much higher than were expected to occur in normal flight training. The U.S. Army and Navy tested the prototype in 1934. At the conclusion of these tests, the Navy ordered the aircraft while the Army decided to wait for the introduction of the improved Model 75 appearing in 1936. Over the next decade, the Army received nearly 8,500 Stearmans in five different variants. The difference among these versions were the engines fitted; Kaydets were fitted with Lycoming (PT-13), Continental (PT-17) or Jacobs (PT-18) radial engines. The U.S. Navy took delivery of their first Stearman (called the NS-1) in 1934. Powered with the obsolete but readily available Wright R-790-8 engine, the NS-1 proved its worth as a primary trainer. The Navy purchased several thousand of an improved model, the N2S. The N2S was built in five sub-variants, each variant being equipped with a different model engine. Additionally, the Canadian armed forces took delivery of 300 PT-27s, a winterized version of the PT-17.

A later, more powerful version of the Stearman, the Model 76, was purchased by Argentina, Brazil and the Philippines. The Model 76 featured wing mounted .30 caliber machine guns, a bomb rack between the landing struts and a single machine gun for the rear cockpit. These aircraft were used as light attack or reconnaissance aircraft. After World War II, many Stearmans were fitted with Pratt & Whitney 450 h.p. engines and utilized as crop dusters. These more powerful Stearmans are also commonly used for wing-walking or aerobatic routines at air shows.

The PT-13B on display was built by the Stearman Division of the Boeing Aircraft Company and accepted by the United States Army Air Corps. on May 20, 1940. It was converted to a "C" model by the addition of an electrical system, lighting, extra instruments and an instrument hood (for flight by reference to instruments, training) in the rear cockpit. In June 1940 it was transferred to Oxnard Field California where it served as a primary trainer. In June 1944 it was transferred to Lancaster. In March 1945 it was transferred to Las Vegas. In July 1945 it was transferred to Reno Nevada and discharged from military service. From 1945 to 1977, 40-1650 served as a training aid for aviation mechanic students at Los Angeles Community College. In 1984 after a 4 year restoration, 40-1650 once again took to the sky over California. The restoration performed by Norm and Carole Rowe and Jim and Katy Spriggs of California returned 40-1650 to its original Army Air Corps condition. Stearman 40-1650 was added to the Cavanaugh Flight Museum collection in 2007 and can routinely be seen in the sky over North Dallas.

Click here for information on how you can take a ride in this historic biplane.

 

ENGINE Lycoming R-680 220 h.p.
WING SPAN 32 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH 24 feet, 10 inches
HEIGHT 9 feet, 2 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 2,700 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY Boeing Aviation
TOTAL BUILT 10,346
TOTAL EXISTING 2,136
FIRST BUILT 1933
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1940
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 104 m.p.h.
RANGE 260 miles
SERVICE CEILING 14,000 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 40-1650

Messerschmitt Me-109/Hispano HA-112

 

Hitler's armies and air force, the famous Luftwaffe, began their conquest of western Europe on April 9, 1940, following their victory over Poland in 1939. Conquering Norway, Belgium, Holland, Luxemburg and France in less than eighty-five days, the Nazi war machine rolled west toward the Atlantic Ocean and England. Hitler's new style of fighting, the Blitzkrieg (lightning war), staggered the Allied defenses. When France surrendered on June 22, 1940 only Britain was left to face Nazi Germany.

The Me-109 was the best known and most produced German fighter of World War II. It was the backbone of the German fighter command and ruled the skies over Europe from 1939 to 1941, as Hitler spread his empire over the continent. The Me-109s earned the respect of Germany's enemies in every theater of conflict and were greatly feared by Allied bomber crews during the later half of the war. Designed by Professor Willy Messerschmitt in 1934, the Bf. 109 was first flown in September 1935. This prototype was powered by a Rolls-Royce Kestrel in-line engine because the engine that the Bf. 109 was designed for, the Junkers Jumo 210, was not yet available. In July 1938, the firm that initiated the design (Bayerische Flugzeugwerke AG), was redesignated Messerschmitt AG, so later Messerschmitt designs often carried the prefix “Me” instead of “Bf”.

The Me-109 was a formidable opponent for the early marks of Spitfire; its low speed handling qualities were excellent and its rate of climb matched the Spitfire. Moreover, it had a higher service ceiling and it had one other major advantage - fuel injection. This allowed the Me-109's powerplant to run flawlessly regardless of the aircraft's attitude, unlike the Rolls-Royce engines of early Spitfires, which cut out at the slightest suggestion of negative G. The Messerschmitt had its vices, too: the cockpit was very small, the heavily framed canopy restricted the pilot's field of view and the plane's narrow undercarriage made it extremely prone to ground accidents. Many of the 33,000 Me-109s produced were lost in ground accidents.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's Me-109 was built in Germany in 1943 and shipped to Spain that same year as part of an agreement for the licensed production of Me-l09s there. Hispano Aviación, under obligation to supply the Spanish Air Force with fighters after the war, was unable to secure any Daimler-Benz DB 605 engines and instead fitted these planes with a British Rolls-Royce Merlin. Designated the HA-1112, this aircraft served in Spain until 1967. The Me-109 is painted in the personal colors of General Adolf Galland, one of Germany's most famous World War II aces. This aircraft has appeared in a number of films including “Memphis Belle”, “The Battle of Britain”, the H.B.O. film “The Tuskegee Airmen” and the British T.V. series “Piece of Cake”.

 

ENGINE Rolls-Royce Merlin 500-45 developing 1,400 h.p.
ARMAMENT One 20mm cannon and two 7.92mm machine guns
WING SPAN 32 feet, 8.5 inches
LENGTH 29 feet, 7 inches
HEIGHT 8 feet, 2.5 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 7,010 pounds
CREW 1
MANUFACTURED BY Messerschmitt AG
TOTAL BUILT Over 33,000
TOTAL EXISTING 72
FIRST BUILT 1935
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1943
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 419 m.p.h.
RANGE 630 miles
SERVICE CEILING 39,370 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 235

Eastern/Grumman TBM-3E Avenger

 

The Grumman Avenger is truly an unsung hero of World War II. Designed in 1939, the Avenger fought a global war in some of the most adverse conditions imaginable. The plane seldom won the fame it so rightly deserved and most Avengers spent their careers conducting routine and mundane, but critical patrol duties. At the time of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Navy's premier torpedo bomber was the obsolete Douglas TBD Devastator. Although the TBD was little more than two years old, the Navy recognized that it needed a more capable torpedo plane and needed it quickly. Both Chance-Vought and Grumman responded to the Navy's requests for a new torpedo bomber. The Grumman XTBF-1 proved to be faster, lighter, better armed, and carried a larger payload than the Chance-Vought design. The Grumman design impressed the Navy, which placed an order for the new plane in December 1940. The prototype flew on August 7,1941 and the first TBFs reached operational squadrons in January 1942. Entering service so soon after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the new aircraft was appropriately named the “Avenger,” although her crews nicknamed the plane the “Turkey.”

Grumman designed the Avenger as a torpedo bomber, but the plane could carry bombs in the internal bomb bay or a mixed load of depth charges and 5-inch rockets under the wings. Avengers were superb sub hunters and both the U.S Navy and Royal Navy used the plane to hunt German submarines that preyed upon Allied shipping in the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean. In the Pacific, Avengers hunted down the Japanese surface fleet and supported Marine and Army troops during island landings. Former President George Bush piloted both the TBF-1C and TBM-1C versions of the Avenger and was forced to bail out of a VT-51 TBM in the Pacific. He narrowly escaped capture by the Japanese and was quickly rescued by a U.S. Navy submarine.

By 1943 Grumman was turning out more than 150 Avengers a month. However, the F6F Hellcat was the company's top priority, so the Navy arranged to have the Avenger built by General Motors in five idle East Coast automobile plants. The General Motors TBM Avenger was virtually identical to the Grumman-built TBF. Eastern Aircraft, General Motor's aircraft division, produced TBMs at an astounding rate, turning out 400 TBMs in March 1945 alone. Eastern built 7,546 TBMs or 77% of all Avengers produced. When the Avenger production lines stopped in 1945, nearly 10,000 Avengers had been built, making the aircraft the most produced naval strike aircraft of all time.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's TBM-3E was built in 1944 and is believed to have served with the U.S. Navy in San Diego. The aircraft is painted in the scheme of Marine Torpedo Squadron 132 from the escort carrier U.S.S. Cape Glouchester (CVE-109) during World War II.

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE Wright R-2600 Cyclone 1,900 h.p.
ARMAMENT 3 -.50 cal. machine guns & up to 2,000 lbs. of ordnance
WING SPAN 54 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH 40 feet, 9 inches
HEIGHT 13 feet, 9 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 16,412 pounds
CREW 3
MANUFACTURED BY Eastern Aircraft
TOTAL BUILT 9,839
TOTAL EXISTING 145
FIRST BUILT 1941
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1944
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 276 m.p.h.
RANGE 1,130 miles
SERVICE CEILING 23,400 feet
BUREAU NUMBER 86280

CASA 2111E/Heinkel He-111

 

The Heinkel He-111's sleek lines mask the plane's capability and versatility as a medium bomber. This aircraft was classified as a passenger/mail plane to circumvent limits imposed on German rearmament by the Treaty of Versailles. Designed in the early 1930s, production began in November 1936. Almost from its introduction, the He-111 was engaged in combat; early model He-111s served in Spain with the infamous "Condor Legion" in support of Nationalist forces during the Spanish Civil War.

The He-111 was well liked by its crews and despite its relatively light defensive armament, was able to fend off enemy fighter attacks and return to base with heavy damage. The He-111 was also very adaptable. He-111s were used to launch V-1 "Buzz Bombs", transport men and equipment as well as drop paratroopers. A five-engine variant, the He-111Z, was even produced to tow combat gliders.

Roughly 7,000 He-111s (in various models) were produced and operated extensively around the world for more than two decades. He-111s were shipped to China, Romania, Hungary, Slovakia, Spain, Turkey and Bulgaria. Beginning in 1943, Spain received approximately 100 He-111s as a gift from Nazi Germany and produced 130 copies. Initially, these Spanish built He-111s, known as CASA 2.111s, were fitted with German engines. However, between 1953 and 1956, Spain purchased 173 Rolls-Royce Merlin engines and fitted them to the seventy remaining airframes.

The Museum's 2.111E was manufactured as B2-H-155 in 1950, but due to a lack of engines was put into storage. In 1956, it was modified to photographic and map making configuration and fitted with Merlin engines. It was accepted by the Spanish Air Force on December 14, 1956 as B2-I-27, to serve with the Spanish Air Force Cartographic Group. In 1968, it was painted in German colors and used in the film "Battle of Britain". From 1970 to 1972, it was operated by 403 Squadron from Cuatros Vientos, near Madrid, Spain. In November 1972, it was transferred to 406 Squadron at Torrejon, Spain. In January 1974, it was transferred to 46 Group in Ganda, Canary Islands, and active in the Spanish campaign in the Western Sahara. On January 21, 1975, B2-I-27 was returned to the air armaments factory in Seville, officially listed as surplus, and placed into storage. From all available information, it appears that B2-I-27 was the last CASA 2.111 in active service with the Spanish Air Force.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum added B2-I-27 to its collection in 1995. The aircraft is painted in the color scheme of Kampfgeschwader 51 (KG51) "Edelweiss", of the German Luftwaffe of World War

 

ENGINE Two Rolls-Royce Merlin 500s developing 1,600 h.p. each
ARMAMENT CASA 2111: normally unarmed

He-111: up to six 7.92 machine guns or 20mm cannons and 6,600 lbs. of ordnance
WING SPAN 74 feet, 1 inch
LENGTH 53 feet, 9 inches
HEIGHT 13 feet, 1 inch
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 30,800 pounds
CREW 5
MANUFACTURED BY Construccions Aeronauticas S.A.
TOTAL BUILT Over 7,000
TOTAL EXISTING 15
FIRST BUILT 1935
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1950
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 288 m.p.h.
RANGE 1,277 miles
SERVICE CEILING 32,800 feet
SERIAL NUMBER B2-I-27

Eastern/Grumman FM-2 Wildcat

 

The small, tubby F4F/FM-2 Wildcat is one of the important, yet often forgotten Allied fighters of World War II. Designed in 1935 by the Grumman Aircraft Corp., the XF4F-3 was the first all-metal, carrier launched, monoplane fighter purchased by the U.S. Navy. The F4F beat out competing designs from Brewster and Seversky. The robust and agile F4F was the primary front line fighter of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps at the onset of World War II. This Wildcat proved to be dependable and was loved by pilots and maintenance crews alike.

The first Wildcats to see action were flown by the Royal Navy. Both Britain and France placed orders for the F4F-3 (although with different engines and armament layouts) during late 1939 and early 1940. The aircraft ordered by the French were claimed by the British after France fell in the fall of 1940. Known as the “Martlet”, British Wildcats claimed their first victory on Dec. 25, 1940, almost a full year before the first American Wildcats saw action at Wake Island. The Wildcat was America's primary naval fighter through the end of 1942. However, during 1943 most Wildcat squadrons were re-equipped with either the larger Grumman F6F Hellcat or the Chance-Vought F4U Corsair.

By late June 1942, Grumman found itself hard pressed to maintain maximum production of both the F4F and TBF Avenger, while also beginning to tool-up the F6F Hellcat production lines. As a result, production of the Wildcat was transferred to five East Coast General Motors automobile plants. The General Motors FM-2 was the most numerous Wildcat variant produced. From mid-1943 to the end of the war, General Motors' Eastern Aircraft divison built 4,777 FM-2s -- nearly 70% of all Wildcats produced. The FM-2 differed from the original Grumman F4F in a number of ways. The FM-2 had a lighter, yet more powerful Wright R-1820 radial engine. Additionally, the plane carried four rather than six .50 caliber machine guns and was often fitted with HVARs (High-Velocity Aircraft Rockets) for use against ground targets, ships or surfaced submarines. The FM-2 also had a larger tail than the standard F4F to counter the increased torque produced by the Wright engine.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's FM-2 was one of the last Wildcats built and was accepted by the U.S. Navy only days before the official Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay (a testament to the utility of the type). The museum's FM-2 spent most of its military career in storage at Bethpage, NY and was stricken from the U.S. Navy's inventory in 1947. The aircraft was restored in the late 1970s and was the Oshkosh Fly-In Grand Champion in 1979. Today, this aircraft carries the markings of a FM-2 from VC-70, a composite squadron which operated from the escort carrier U.S.S. Salamaua (CVE-96) from May to September 1945.

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE Wright R-1820-56 developing 1,350 h.p.
ARMAMENT Four .50 cal. machine guns,
six 5-inch HVARs
WING SPAN 38 feet
LENGTH 28 feet, 9 inches
HEIGHT 11 feet, 5 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 8,221 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY General Motors - Eastern Aircraft
TOTAL BUILT 7,251
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 45
FIRST F4F BUILT 1940
FIRST FM-2 BUILT 1943
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1945
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 322 m.p.h.
RANGE (W/ EXTERNAL TANKS) 1,150 miles
SERVICE CEILING 35,600 feet
 

Vultee SNV-2/BT-13 Valiant

 

Designated the BT-13 by the Army Air Corps and the SNV-2 by the Navy, the Vultee Valiant was the next aircraft cadet pilots flew after learning to fly the PT-17 (Stearman), PT-19 or PT-22. Less forgiving than these primary trainers, the SNV/BT-13 required the student pilot to pay more attention to the aircraft in flight. Additionally in the SNV/BT-13, student pilots were introduced to advanced items such as a two-way radio for communication with the ground.

Designed in the late 1930s, the SNV/BT-13 was chosen in 1939 by the U.S.A.A.C. and by the Navy in 1940 for use as a basic trainer. A confidence builder for green pilots, the SNV/BT-13 has been described as a “roomy, noisy, aerobatic and smelly” airplane and received the ignominious nickname “The Vultee Vibrator” from its pilots. The aircraft sharpened the pilot's skills and introduced students to the feel of a more complex and powerful aircraft. Unlike the primary trainers that were fitted with a fixed pitch prop, the SNV/BT-13 was equipped with a two position, variable-pitch propeller requiring greater skill to fly. After mastering the SNV/BT-13, pilots advanced to the AT-6 Texan for fighter pilot training or a twin-engined advance trainer for bomber or transport pilot training.

Once America was fully involved in World War II, Vultee received orders for more than 10,000 SNV/BT-13s, making the plane one of the most important American trainer aircraft of the war. Due to a shortage of the BT-13's Wasp Junior radial engine, Vultee began to fit the Wright R-975-11 radial to BT-13 airframes. A total of 1,693 BT-15s, as these planes were called, were built before the end of the war. Today, the few airworthy SNV/BT-13s or BT 15s left are very popular with warbird collectors and can often be seen at airshows around the country.

The paint scheme of the SNV-2 on display is authentic for a SNV-2 based at the Naval Air Station in Corpus Christi, Texas during World War II. This SNV-2 was delivered to Cabaniss Field, Corpus Christi on April 8,1944. It served in VN12D8, a training squadron based at Cabaniss Field from August 1944 to February 1945. In March 1945, it was transferred to VN13D8C (also a training squadron) at Chase Field in Brownsville, Texas where it served until March l945, when it was transferred to the Naval Air Station in Clinton, Oklahoma. It remained in Clinton until October 31,1945, before it was stricken from the Navy's records.

 

ENGINE Pratt & Whitney R-985 Junior Wasp
WING SPAN 42 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH 28 feet, 8 inches
HEIGHT 12 feet, 5 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 4,227 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY Consolidated Vultee Aviation
TOTAL BUILT 11,537
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 150
FIRST BUILT 1939
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1944
MAXIMUM SPEED 155 m.p.h.
RANGE 880 miles
SERVICE CEILING 19,400 feet

 

North American AT-6/SNJ Texan

 

The North American Texan trainer is one of the most important aircraft of all time and is universally recognized. First built as the NA-16 in 1935, the Texan was in continual production for nearly 10 years and in active use for more than five decades. Primarily used as a trainer, the Texan remains a favorite among warbird collectors around the world.

The U.S. Navy took delivery of a version of the North American trainer called the NJ-1 in late 1936. This aircraft had fixed landing gear and a fabric covered rear fuselage. Besides serving as trainers, these aircraft also flew as command and staff transports. Shortly after the appearance of the NJ-1, the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) released a requirement for an advanced trainer offering performance and handling as close as possible to the generation of fighters then in use. North American added a 500 h.p. Pratt & Whitney R-1340 radial engine to the NA-16 airframe and called the new aircraft the NA-26. The NA-26 had retractable landing gear, a full metal fuselage and a position for a single fixed machine gun. The USAAC was elated with the aircraft and ordered it into service as the BC-1. The U.S. Navy also purchased the aircraft as the SNJ-1. From these small initial orders, the North American “Texan” (as the aircraft was commonly known) grew into what has become an all-time aeronautical classic.

The basic Texan design constantly underwent modifications. The last model of the Texan, the T-6J, was produced for the U.S. Air Force in the early 1950s. The AT-6 was commonly fitted with a single fixed .30 cal. machine gun, which was used for basic aerial and air-to-ground gunnery training. During the Korean War, the U.S. Air Force and Marine Corps fitted Texans with smoke and white phosphorous rockets and used the plane as forward air controllers.

The British Commonwealth, desperately needing modern aircraft, eventually took delivery of nearly 5,000 T-6's. These aircraft were flown by Australia, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand, South Africa and Southern Rhodesia. Canada produced a similar aircraft (under license), the Harvard, which featured a heating system using engine exhaust but otherwise was largely identical to the American Texan. The South African Air Force (SFAF) retired their fleet of 100 T-6 trainers in the early 1990s, more than 50 years after the SFAF took delivery of its first Texan. The Cavanaugh Flight Museum owns two of these classic aircraft. While the military histories of both aircraft remain unclear, it is known that the museum's gray T-6 was built at North American's Inglewood, California plant in 1942. The bare-metal T-6 rolled out of the same plant a year later. These aircraft are used for the museum's customer flights, as utility aircraft and for aerial photography work. Both of the museum's T-6's have appeared as pace planes for the T-6 aerial races at the Reno Air Races.

 

 

CFM AT-6 Ride, Click Here!

 



Click here for information on how you can take a ride in this historic warbird aircraft.

 

ENGINE Pratt & Whitney R-1340 w/600 h.p.
ARMAMENT Normally none; can be fitted with one or two .30 cal. machine guns
WING SPAN 42 feet, 7 inches
LENGTH 29 feet
HEIGHT 12 feet, 9 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 5,617 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY North American Aviation
TOTAL BUILT Over 15,000
TOTAL EXISTING Over 1,200
FIRST BUILT 1938
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1942 (Gray), 1943 (Silver)
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 210 m.p.h.
RANGE 770 miles
SERVICE CEILING 23,200 feet

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VIII

 

Its sleek lines and graceful curves make the Supermarine Spitfire arguably the most esthetically pleasing aircraft of World War II. Although only available in small numbers during the fall of 1940, the Spitfire became world famous thanks to its performance during the Battle of Britain. The Spitfire was truly a global fighter with more than forty different versions of the aircraft used all over the world. The Spitfire was the product of the great British designer Reginald J. Mitchell, who found fame designing racing seaplanes for the Schneider Trophy races. First flown on March 5,1936, the Type 300 (as the prototype of the Spitfire was known) was ordered into production for the Royal Air Force (RAF) in July 1936. When World War II broke out in late 1939, the RAF had taken delivery of a total of 306 Spitfires, only half of which were in service with front line squadrons (the remainder were assigned to training units).

As the air war over Europe raged on, Supermarine continuously updated and modified the Spitfire to keep it ahead of, or at least on par with, the latest version of the German Me-109 or FW-190. The basic Spitfire airframe proved readily adaptable, receiving a variety of engines, wing layouts and armament mixtures. During its long career, Spitfires were modified for use as naval fighters (the Seafire), unarmed photo reconnaissance aircraft, fighter/bombers, night fighters and seaplanes. When Spitfire production ended in March 1949 more than 20,000 Spitfres, of all types, had been manufactured. The Spitfire Mk. VIII was basically a non-pressurized version of the Mk. VII. The Mk. VIII featured a stronger fuselage than earlier Spitfires and a retractable tail wheel. Ironically, the Mk. VIII entered service after the Mk. IX, which was built as a “stopgap” fighter following the long teething period experienced by the Mk. VIII. First ordered in July 1942, Supermarine built nearly 1,658 Mk. VIIIs by the end of 1945.

The RAF took delivery of the museum's Mk. VIII in June 1944. It was quickly tropicalized in England and shipped to Bombay, India in July 1944. Once in the Far East, the plane was assigned to the RAF's No. 17 Squadron, based at China Bay and Vavyuina, Ceylon (Sri Lanka). It flew numerous combat missions against the Japanese from July 1944 to June 1945 and often flew as a fighter escort for the No. 28 Squadron, a dive bomber unit equipped with Hawker Hurricanes.

The aircraft was sold to the Indian Air Force in 1947. After thirty years in India, the aircraft was sold in 1977 and returned to England. An Italian collector purchased the plane in 1979 and completely restored the aircraft. The Cavanaugh Flight Museum acquired the Spitfire in 1993 and it wears the same colors it carried while serving with No.17 Squadron during World War II.

 

ENGINE Rolls-Royce Merlin 66 developing 1,720 h.p.
ARMAMENT 2 Hispano 20mm cannons, 4 Browning .303 machine guns
WING SPAN 36 feet, 10 inches
LENGTH 32 feet, 2 inches
HEIGHT 11 feet, 8 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 7,767 pounds
CREW 1
MANUFACTURED BY Vickers Supermarine
TOTAL BUILT 20,334
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 70
FIRST BUILT 1938 (MK. VIII - 1943)
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1944
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 404 m.p.h.
RANGE W/ EXTERNAL TANKS 1,180 miles
SERVICE CEILING 41,500 feet
SERIAL NUMBER MT719
.

Goodyear/Chance-Vought FG-1D Corsair

 

The famous gull-wing design of the F4U Corsair makes the plane one of the most distinctive fighters of World War II. Designed and built by Chance-Vought, the Corsair prototype first flew on May 29, 1940. It was the world's first single-engine fighter capable of speeds over 400 mph in level flight. Though first rejected by the U.S Navy, the F4U proved to be one of the best all-around fighters of World War II and was the only American piston engined World War II fighter produced in large numbers after 1945.
Cavanaugh Flight Museum Corsair. Photo By: Scott Slocum, Aero Marketing
During World War II the Corsair proved more than a match for the Japanese Zero and other advanced Japanese fighters. The Corsair achieved an impressive eleven-to-one victory ratio against Japanese aircraft. Corsairs also excelled in the ground attack role and were heavily employed as close air support aircraft during the Pacific island hopping campaign.

As a testament to the plane's effectiveness, Japanese ground troops nicknamed the Corsair “the Whistling Death” (the plane's distinctive whistling was caused by airflow over the F4U's leading edge oil coolers). Later during the Korean War, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps used the plane almost exclusively in the attack role, carrying high explosive bombs, napalm and high-velocity aircraft rockets. Corsairs were instrumental in the Marine's famous “advance in a different direction” from the Chosin Reservoir in December 1950.
Cavanaugh Flight Museum Corsair. Bureau Number 92399
The Cavanaugh Flight Museum’s Corsair, is one of 120 Corsair IVs ordered from Goodyear Aircraft Corp. for the British Royal Navy. With the end of the war near, the order was cancelled and the aircraft were delivered to the U.S. Navy. It was accepted July 3, 1945 at Norfolk VA. After reconditioning to US Navy FG-1D specifications, it was assigned to VF-1 at Naval Air Auxiliary Field (NAAS) Cecil Field, Jacksonville FL and served from 10/5/46-6/23/47.  The remainder of its assignments are as follows:  Norfolk VA, Naval Air Reserve Training Unit (NARTU) 6/24//47-11/25/47; Overhaul at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville FL; VMF-451 at NAS Willow Grove PA, 5/2/48-4/5/49; Storage at NAS Jacksonville FL; NARTU at NAS New Orleans LA, 12/10/49-8/6/51; Overhaul at NAS Jacksonville FL; NARTU at NAS Grosse Isle MI, 1/8/52-3/20/52; Airframe overhaul to Marine specifications at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point NC; Marine Air Squadron 31 at MCAS Miami FL, 5/14/52-12/17/52; NARTU at NAS Willow Grove PA, 12/18/52-8/18/53; Storage at NAS Jacksonville FL until stricken from Navy records January 1957.

 

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum’s Corsair is finished in the armament arrangement of an F4U-1C, having 4, wing mounted 20MM cannons. The paint scheme is that of Major Archie Donahue’s Corsair when he served with VMF-112 at Guadalcanal. On May 13, 1943, Maj. Donahue destroyed five Zero aircraft in a single engagement, thus becoming an “Ace-in-a-day”. Maj. Donahue is one of only 7 Marine pilots to accomplish this feat. He repeated this accomplishment by destroying another 5 enemy aircraft over Okinawa in 1945 while serving with VMF-451. He is credited with a total of 14 aerial victories and his decorations include the Navy Cross, three Distinguished Flying Crosses, and five Air Medals.

 

Cavanaugh Flight Museum Corsair Ride

 

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE Pratt & Whitney R-2800-18W Double Wasp 2,100 h.p.
ARMAMENT 4 - 20mm cannon & up to 2,000 lbs of ordnance
WING SPAN 41 feet
LENGTH 33 feet, 8 inches
HEIGHT 14 feet, 9 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 16,160 pounds
CREW 1
MANUFACTURED BY Goodyear Aircraft Corporation: Under license from Chance-Vought Aircraft
TOTAL BUILT Over 12,571
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 100
FIRST BUILT 1940
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1945
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 466 m.p.h.
RANGE W/ EXTERNAL TANKS 1,005 miles
SERVICE CEILING 41,500 feet
BUREAU NUMBER 92399

 

 

de Havilland Tiger Moth

 

Lightweight, easy to manufacture and fly, the de Havilland Tiger Moth is to English aviation what the J-3 Cub or N2S-4 Stearman is to American aviation. Based on a line of highly successful civilian aircraft, the Tiger Moth went on to be the primary basic trainer for England and the Commonwealth powers during World War II. In the 1920s, Geoffrey de Havilland designed the famous DH 60 Cirrus Moth which first flew on February 22, 1925. The Cirrus Moth was a quiet and comfortable aircraft with a relatively inexpensive price of £830 Sterling. It marked the beginning of private flying in Britain and throughout the world. The Taylor Piper Cub was still 10 years in the future.

The early Cirrus Moth was succeeded by several variants: the Genet Moth the Hermes Moth and the Gypsy Moth. The success of the de Havilland peaked due to a massive flood. Production rose from one airplane a week to more than three a day. By 1929, the price had dropped accordingly to a mere £650 Sterling, and 85 out of 100 private airplanes in Great Britain were Moths of one model or another. After His Highness, the Prince of Wales purchased a Moth, the aircraft became extremely fashionable. Society magazines were full of pictures of sports characters and “bright young lady pilots” setting out for weekends in the country flying their Moths. Any kind of private airplane in England became known as “a Moth” much like any small airplane in America was “a Cub”.

All of these Moths were conventional one or two seat biplanes with unswept, unstaggered wings. Consequently, access to the forward cockpit of the two-seat version was restricted by the center-section struts. This shortcoming was eliminated in the Tiger Moth by moving the upper wing section forward to clear the front cockpit while sweeping both wings back to keep the aircraft's center of gravity (C.G.) in the desired position.

The prototype DH 82 Tiger Moth first flew on October 26, 1931 and quickly aroused interest in the Royal Air Force (R.A.F.). De Havilland delivered the R.A.F.'s first Tiger Moths in 1932. When World War II started, the R.A.F. had more than 1,000 Tiger Moths in service. By the end of the war, well over 4,200 Tiger Moths had been delivered and the majority of R.A.F: pilots received their elementary training in a Tiger Moth. In addition, almost 3,000 Tiger Moths were built in Australia, Canada and New Zealand for use in the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. The Tiger Moth on display was one of 1,384 examples built in Canada during World War II and served as a primary trainer in the Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

 

ENGINE de Havilland Gypsy Major 1C 130 h.p.
WING SPAN 29 feet, 4 inches
LENGTH 23 feet, 11 inches
HEIGHT 8 feet, 10 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 1,733 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY de Havilland Aircraft
TOTAL BUILT 8,706
TOTAL IN EXISTENCE Approximately 200
FIRST BUILT 1931
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1942
MAXIMUM SPEED 107 m.p.h.
RANGE 275 miles
SERVICE CEILING 14,600 feet

Curtiss P-40N Warhawk

 

Built by Curtiss-Wright, the P-40 Warhawk was the U.S Army Air Force's standard fighter at the time of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Although it could not match the performance of the Japanese A6M Zero or the German Me-109, the P-40's strong construction and heavy armament made it a competent foe for any Axis aircraft. Operating as part of the Chinese Air Force over mainland China, the American Volunteer Group (A.V.G.) -- better known as “The Flying Tigers” -- used their P-40s to win victories over nearly 300 Japanese planes from June 1941 to July 1942, while losing only 12 of their own in aerial combat.

Curtiss-Wright developed the P-40 Warhawk in the late 1930s to replace the Curtiss P-36. The XP-40 was basically a P-36 airframe refitted with an Allison V-1710 in-line engine instead of the P-36's Pratt and Whitney radial. In this configuration, the XP-40 boasted a top speed of 342 mph and beat both the Bell P-39 Airacobra and the Lockheed P-38 Lightning in the 1939 Army Air Corps (AAC) fighter fly-off. Though outdated by 1941, the P-40 saw extensive action in China, India, North Africa, Egypt, Russia and the Pacific. The aircraft received great acclaim from those who flew it. According to one P-40 pilot: “We couldn't outmaneuver [the Japanese] fighters, but we could out-dive them, and the Hawk would take more punishment than anything we met. It was a sturdy, fine airplane.” The P-40N was the last and fastest production variant of the Warhawk. By reducing the overall weight of the design, Curtiss managed to increase the P-40N's overall top speed to 378 mph. The P-40N was also fitted with a new canopy improving the pilot's visibility to the rear. A total of 5,219 P-40Ns were built making it the most numerous of the P-40 series.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's P-40N (serial number 44-7369) was constructed at the Curtiss-Wright plant in Buffalo, New York and was delivered to the Army Air Force (AAF.) on May 26,1944. The plane was sent in June 1944 to Peterson Army Air Field, Colorado Springs, Colorado and served with the 268th AAF Base Unit (Combat Crew Training Station-Fighter, Second Air Force). In March 1945, the aircraft was transferred to the 232nd AAF Base Unit (2nd A.F.), stationed at the Dalhart Army Air Field (Texas). In June 1945, the plane was disposed as surplus.

The P-40N was purchased by the museum in 1995 from Joseph Mabee, who had owned the aircraft since 1978. Today, the aircraft is painted in the scheme of Major General Charles R. Bond, Jr.'s No. 5 and is representative of P-40Bs and P-40Es flown by the Flying Tigers in the early days of World War II. The aircraft often appears at air shows across the country.

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE Allison V 1710-115 1,460 h.p.
ARMAMENT Six .50 cal. machine guns & up to 500 lbs. of ordnance
WING SPAN 37 feet, 3.5 inches
LENGTH 33 feet, 3.72 inches
HEIGHT 12 feet, 4.5 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 8,850 pounds
MANUFACTURED BY Curtiss-Wright
TOTAL BUILT Roughly 15,000
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 90
FIRST BUILT 1940
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT May 1944
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 378 m.p.h.
RANGE 240 miles
SERVICE CEILING 38,000 feet

Boeing N2S-4 Stearman Kaydet

 

Nicknamed the “Yellow Peril” thanks to its somewhat tricky ground handling characteristics, the Stearman is one of the most easily recognized aircraft. Its simple construction, rugged dependability and nimble handling made the Stearman much loved by those who flew and trained on it. The Stearman Kaydet, as it was officially named, was the only American aircraft used during World War II that was completely standardized for both Army and Navy use as the PT-13D (Army) and N2S-4 (Navy). Sold by the thousands after World War II, the Stearman has had a long and full career as a trainer, crop duster and air show performer. The name “Stearman” is so widely known that it has become the generic name for almost all currently flown biplanes. It is truly a “classic.”

The famed Stearman Model 75 has its roots in the earlier Model 70, which was chosen in 1934 as the U.S. Navy's primary trainer. At a time when biplanes were becoming a thing of the past, the Model 70 offered the fledgling pilot a steady and sturdy steed. Designed and built in only 60 days, the prototype Model 70 could withstand load factors much higher than were expected to occur in normal flight training. The U.S. Army and Navy tested the prototype in 1934. At the conclusion of these tests, the Navy ordered the aircraft while the Army decided to wait for the introduction of the improved Model 75 appearing in 1936. Over the next decade, the Army received nearly 8,500 Stearmans in five different variants. The difference among these versions were the engines fitted; Kaydets were fitted with Lycoming (PT-13), Continental (PT-17) or Jacobs (PT-18) radial engines. The U.S. Navy took delivery of their first Stearman (called the NS-1) in 1934. Powered with the obsolete but readily available Wright R-790-8 engine, the NS-1 proved its worth as a primary trainer. The Navy purchased several thousand of an improved model, the N2S. The N2S was built in five sub-variants, each variant being equipped with a different model engine. Additionally, the Canadian armed forces took delivery of 300 PT-27s, a winterized version of the PT-17.

A later, more powerful version of the Stearman, the Model 76, was purchased by Argentina, Brazil and the Philippines. The Model 76 featured wing mounted .30 caliber machine guns, a bomb rack between the landing struts and a single machine gun for the rear cockpit. These aircraft were used as light attack or reconnaissance aircraft. After World War II, many Stearmans were fitted with Pratt & Whitney 450 h.p. engines and utilized as crop dusters. These more powerful Stearmans are also commonly used for wing-walking or aerobatic routines at air shows.

The Cavanaugh Flight Museum's N2S-4 was assembled in 1985 from original Stearman components. The aircraft is painted in an authentic U.S. Navy paint scheme.

 

 

Click To Ride

 

 

ENGINE Continental W-670 220 h.p.
WING SPAN 32 feet, 2 inches
LENGTH 24 feet, 10 inches
HEIGHT 9 feet, 2 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 2,700 pounds
CREW 2
MANUFACTURED BY Boeing Aviation
TOTAL BUILT 10,346
TOTAL EXISTING 2,136
FIRST BUILT 1933
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1985
MAXIMUM SPEED 104 m.p.h.
RANGE 260 miles
SERVICE CEILING 14,000 feet

North American P-51D Mustang

 

Sleek and elegant, the North American P-51D Mustang was truly a "fighter pilot's dream." It is perhaps the best known fighter aircraft of all time. Designed in record time at the request of the British in 1940, the Mustang possessed a deadly combination of speed, endurance, maneuverability and firepower. By the end of the Mustang's production run, more than 15,000 P-51s had been built and the aircraft had seen service around the world as an escort fighter, fighter/bomber, dive bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, and finally, a race plane. The Mustang first drew blood in the spring of 1942 and the last Mustangs were withdrawn from active service more than four decades later - a service record which no other fighter aircraft has been able to match.

Manufacture of the Mustang began in early 1941 at North American's Inglewood, California plant. As orders for the new fighter quickly increased, North American opened a new plant near Dallas, in Grand Prairie, Texas to assist in the production of the P-51.

Originally fitted with an Allison V-1710 engine, the Mustang proved to be a superb fighter at low to medium altitudes, but its performance dropped off above 12,000 feet. At the urging of a Rolls Royce test pilot, a few RAF P-51s were tested with a Rolls Royce Merlin engine and the Mustang found new legs. The P-51D rolled out of the factory with a Packard V-1650.  The Packard V-1650 is a US built Rolls Royce Merlin produced under license by the Packard Motor Car Company.  With the powerful, supercharged Merlin, the Mustang's high altitude performance drastically increased as did the plane's range. This immediate boost in range allowed the plane (with drop tanks) to escort American bombers into the heart of Germany or Japan and back. Once the bombers had full fighter coverage, the air war for Europe and the Pacific was as good as won.

The museum's P-51D was manufactured in 1944 and shipped to England. It was assigned to the 9th Air Force, 370th Fighter Group, 401st Fighter Squadron, and was flown by Lt. Hjalmar Johnsen. In June 1947 it was sold to the Swedish Air Force and served as Flygyapnet (FV) Serial No. 26115 based at F-4, Ostersund. Between 1952-53 it was sold to the Dominican Republic and served as Fuerza Aerea Dominica Serial No. 1918 until 1984 when it was retired from active service. The plane is painted in the colors and markings of Lt. Hjalmar Johnsen while in service with 401st Fighter Squadron, 370th Fighter Group, of the 9th Air Force during World War II.

 

 

 

 

CFM P-51 Brat III Ride! Click Here!

 

 

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE Packard Merlin V 1650-7 developing 1,590 h.p.
ARMAMENT 6 - .50 cal. machine guns & up to 2,000 lbs of ordnance
WING SPAN 37 feet
LENGTH 32 feet, 3 inches
HEIGHT 13 feet, 8 inches
MAX TAKEOFF WEIGHT 11,600 pounds
CREW 1
MANUFACTURED BY North American Aviation
TOTAL BUILT Over 15,500
TOTAL EXISTING Approximately 200
FIRST BUILT October 1940
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT March 1944
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM SPEED 445 m.p.h.
RANGE W/ EXTERNAL TANKS 1,895 miles
SERVICE CEILING 41,900 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 44-72339

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The Cavanaugh Flight Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization devoted to promoting aviation studies and to perpetuating America's aviation heritage; the museum fulfills its mission by restoring, operating, maintaining and displaying historically-significant, vintage aircraft, and by collecting materials related to the history of aviation.

 


 

4572 Claire Chennault, Addison, TX 75001  [Map] (North of Downtown Dallas)

Phone Number: 972-380-8800

Hours: Mon - Sat: 9:00am - 5:00pm, Sun: 11:00am - 5:00pm

Admission: Adults: $10.00 Seniors & Military: $8.00 Children (4 - 12): $5.00 Children 3 & Under: Free


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