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 Cavanaugh Flight Museum Warbird Rides

 

 

De Havilland Canada designed the Caribou in response to a US Army requirement for a tactical transport. The mission was to supply forward battle areas with troops and supplies and evacuate casualties. The prototype DHC-4 Caribou made its first flight in 1958.

Impressed with the DHC-4's STOL (Short Takeoff and Landing) capabilities and potential for delivering troops, supplies, and equipment to isolated outposts., the US Army ordered five for evaluation as YAC-1s. The designation was changed in 1962 to CV-2 Caribou. The U.S. Army purchased 159 of the aircraft for use during the Vietnam War, where larger cargo aircraft such as the C-123 Provider and the C-130 Hercules could not land on the shorter landing strips. The Caribou could carry 26 fully equipped paratroops or 20 litter patients or two Jeeps. As a cargo aircraft the Caribou can haul more than three tons of equipment, and the rear loading ramp could also be used for parachute dropping.

In 1967, when responsibility for all fixed-wing tactical transports was transferred to the U.S. Air Force, the Caribou received the designation C-7. By the end of production in 1973, a total of 307 aircraft were built. The Air Force operated the Caribou in active, reserve and guard unit service until the 1980s. After retirement from the Air Force, 20 Caribous were transferred to the Army National Guard where they operated until the early 1990 s.

The Caribou on display, Serial No. 62-4149 was accepted by the U.S. Army in 1962 and assigned to the 61st Aviation Company, XVIII Airborne Corps at Ft. Bragg, NC in early 1963. On June 20, 1963 18 aircraft (including 62-4149) of the 61st AVN Co. were deployed to Vietnam. In 1967, 62-4149 was turned over to the U.S. Air Force and assigned to the 457th TCS. The remaining assignments are as follows: 1976-77, New Jersey ANG; 77-87, Maryland ANG; 87-90, Connecticut Army National Guard.

The aircraft was completely restored to its original Army configuration and markings in 1999 by the Army Aviation Heritage Foundation. During the restoration, 21 patched bullet holes were found throughout the aircraft testifying to the aircraft's Vietnam combat experience. The Cavanaugh Flight Museum added 62-4149 to its collection in 2007.

*This Aircraft is available for your airshow!*

 

ENGINE TWO PRATT & WHITNEY R-2000-7M2 developing 1,450 h.p. each
WING SPAN 95 feet 7.5 inches
LENGTH 72 feet, 7 inches
HEIGHT 31 feet, 9 inches
MAX GROSS WEIGHT (NORMAL OPERATIONS) 28,500 pounds
CREW 3
MANUFACTURED BY De Havilland Canada
TOTAL BUILT 307
FIRST BUILT 1958
MUSEUM'S AIRCRAFT BUILT 1962
ON DISPLAY AT Cavanaugh Flight Museum, Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas, Texas
MAXIMUM CRUISE SPEED AT SEA LEVEL 170 m.p.h.
MAXIMUM RANGE AT 28,500 LB GROSS WEIGHT 1,392 miles
SERVICE CEILING AT 28,500 LG GROSS WEIGHT 26,200 feet
SERIAL NUMBER 62-4149
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The Cavanaugh Flight Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) educational organization devoted to promoting aviation studies and to perpetuating America's aviation heritage; the museum fulfills its mission by restoring, operating, maintaining and displaying historically-significant, vintage aircraft, and by collecting materials related to the history of aviation.




4572 Claire Chennault, Addison, TX 75001  [Map] (North of Downtown Dallas)

Phone Number: 972-380-8800

Hours: Mon - Sat: 9:00am - 5:00pm, Sun: 11:00am - 5:00pm

Admission: Adults: $10.00 Seniors & Military: $8.00 Children (4 - 12): $5.00 Children 3 & Under: Free


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